Assessment As, For, and Of Learning





This Thursday at 8pm CST #saskedchat will be exploring Assessment - As, For, and Of Learning. 
As often happens in education, the discussion of assessment seems to result in polarization of ideas where individuals take an Either/Or stance. This can be seen on the discussion of homework vs stop homework, where discussions often take the well-worn path of the all-in/out stance. Inevitably this type of discussion polarizes the issue(s) which really doesn't help anyone, except maybe those people trying to sell something (another little issue that is steadily creeping into educational discussions lately). 
Assessment is a part of schooling and people seem to agree that assessment needs to change but, depending on your point of view and who you talk to, the way it needs to change is not necessarily clear. There are calls for eliminating high stakes testing as they are currently used while others point to their use around the globe with mixed results
Assessment As, Of, and For Learning
There are many times during a day in which I am 'assessed'. If I'm driving and a police officer is watching traffic, I will be assessed on how well I am following the rules of the road and adhering to the laws, at that particular instant. When I cook for my family, how well I do is 'assessed' by whether people like what was cooked or not. Depending on how you view assessment, each day we are assessed in a variety of ways, some more directly than others. Drive over the speed limit in a zone where there is photo-radar, you will probably receive a ticket for failing to follow the posted speed limit. 
For teachers, ePortfoliosProject Based LearningProblem Based LearningInquiryGenius Hour, Maker SpaceKahootSocrativeGoogle Classroom, FreshgradeFlipgrid and a variety of other tools and strategies are changing how teachers are engaging in assessment with students and is changing how teachers are using assessment in the classroom. As a way to frame the discussion of assessment, looking at "Why" one assesses can help to frame the discussion in a different way.  In order to facilitate this changing assessment landscape, discussing assessment As, Of, and For Learning helps to differentiate the role of assessment and how it is used. 
These are not new terms, nor are they necessarily new ways of looking at assessment. This differentiation does help to see how assessment has shifted from an end-of-unit exam or a 5 paragraph essay to something much more dynamic and complex. 
Assessment As Learning
Assessment As Learning focuses on students self-monitoring their own learning. This is described as meta-cognition - the knowledge of one's thinking. 
Assessment as learning emerges from the idea that learning is not just a matter of transferring ideas from someone who is knowledgeable to someone who is not, but is an active process of cognitive restructuring that occurs when individuals interact with new ideas. Within this view of learning, students are the critical connectors between assessment and learning. For students to be actively engaged in creating their own understanding, they must learn to be critical assessors who make sense of information, relate it to prior knowledge, and use it for new learning. This is the regulatory process in metacognition; that is, students become adept at personally monitoring what they are learning, and use what they discover from the monitoring to make adjustments, adaptations, and even major changes in their thinking. 
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind

 Helping students to understand their own learning is key in helping them develop skills to be life-long learners who will be able to meet the demands and challenges in a world that continues to rapidly change. No one is really sure what will happen in the next 10 years but it will probably be very different than it is today while remaining very similar in many ways. 
Assessment For Learning
Assessment For Learning takes place throughout the learning process from the beginning of the school year until it ends. With the use of different digital platforms, this process can continue throughout the entire time a student is in school, with learning events and reflections occurring in a variety of ways all the while parts of these events being digitally captured to allow teachers, students, and parents to see the growth over time and identify areas that might need further development. 
Assessment for learning occurs throughout the learning process. It is designed to make each student’s understanding visible, so that teachers can decide what they can do to help students progress. Students learn in individual and idiosyncratic ways, yet, at the same time, there are predictable patterns of connections and preconceptions that some students may experience as they move along the continuum from emergent to proficient. In assessment for learning, teachers use assessment as an investigative tool to find out as much as they can about what their students know and can do, and what confusions, preconceptions, or gaps they might have.
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind
Organization such as Canadian Assessment for Learning Network support teachers, schools and parents with Assessment For Learning and work to provide great understanding about the role of Assessment For Learning and it's use within the learning process. 
Assessment Of Learning
Assessment of Learning can be described as a snapshot of a person's learning at a particular point in time. This has traditionally been what was reported on a traditional report card with a grade. 
Assessment of learning refers to strategies designed to confirm what students know, demonstrate whether or not they have met curriculum outcomes or the goals of their individualized programs, or to certify proficiency and make decisions about students’ future programs or placements. It is designed to provide evidence of achievement to parents, other educators, the students themselves, and sometimes to outside groups (e.g., employers, other educational institutions).
Assessment of learning is the assessment that becomes public and results in statements or symbols about how well students are learning.
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind
Various school divisions in Saskatchewan, in Canada, and around the globe have begun to adopt a report card that focuses on feedback and growth as opposed to grades. As with all change, there is resistance of this form of reporting and, in some cases, a call to return to traditional grades. 
What do you think?
This is just a very general overview of Assessment As, For, and Of Learning. There are many more nuances to assessment that often are not discussed. I would highly recommend you check out these resources for a much greater discussion of assessment:
Softening the Edges - by Katie White - an great book about many of the parts of assessment that don't often get discussed. I highly recommend this book as it will challenge you to think of assessment in new ways. 
Checking for Understanding - by Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey - A great book that highlights the use of Formative Assessment at all grade levels. 
Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design - by Carol Ann Tomlinson and Jay McTighe - this has been my go to book for addressing the whole assessment piece - planning like an assessor not like an activity planner. 
What do you think? What are your thought about assessment? How would you like to see things change? 
Join #saskedchat Thursday night at 8pm CST as we explore this topic.

Assessment As, For, and Of Learning





This Thursday at 8pm CST #saskedchat will be exploring Assessment - As, For, and Of Learning. 
As often happens in education, the discussion of assessment seems to result in polarization of ideas where individuals take an Either/Or stance. This can be seen on the discussion of homework vs stop homework, where discussions often take the well-worn path of the all-in/out stance. Inevitably this type of discussion polarizes the issue(s) which really doesn't help anyone, except maybe those people trying to sell something (another little issue that is steadily creeping into educational discussions lately). 
Assessment is a part of schooling and people seem to agree that assessment needs to change but, depending on your point of view and who you talk to, the way it needs to change is not necessarily clear. There are calls for eliminating high stakes testing as they are currently used while others point to their use around the globe with mixed results
Assessment As, Of, and For Learning
There are many times during a day in which I am 'assessed'. If I'm driving and a police officer is watching traffic, I will be assessed on how well I am following the rules of the road and adhering to the laws, at that particular instant. When I cook for my family, how well I do is 'assessed' by whether people like what was cooked or not. Depending on how you view assessment, each day we are assessed in a variety of ways, some more directly than others. Drive over the speed limit in a zone where there is photo-radar, you will probably receive a ticket for failing to follow the posted speed limit. 
For teachers, ePortfoliosProject Based LearningProblem Based LearningInquiryGenius Hour, Maker SpaceKahootSocrativeGoogle Classroom, FreshgradeFlipgrid and a variety of other tools and strategies are changing how teachers are engaging in assessment with students and is changing how teachers are using assessment in the classroom. As a way to frame the discussion of assessment, looking at "Why" one assesses can help to frame the discussion in a different way.  In order to facilitate this changing assessment landscape, discussing assessment As, Of, and For Learning helps to differentiate the role of assessment and how it is used. 
These are not new terms, nor are they necessarily new ways of looking at assessment. This differentiation does help to see how assessment has shifted from an end-of-unit exam or a 5 paragraph essay to something much more dynamic and complex. 
Assessment As Learning
Assessment As Learning focuses on students self-monitoring their own learning. This is described as meta-cognition - the knowledge of one's thinking. 
Assessment as learning emerges from the idea that learning is not just a matter of transferring ideas from someone who is knowledgeable to someone who is not, but is an active process of cognitive restructuring that occurs when individuals interact with new ideas. Within this view of learning, students are the critical connectors between assessment and learning. For students to be actively engaged in creating their own understanding, they must learn to be critical assessors who make sense of information, relate it to prior knowledge, and use it for new learning. This is the regulatory process in metacognition; that is, students become adept at personally monitoring what they are learning, and use what they discover from the monitoring to make adjustments, adaptations, and even major changes in their thinking. 
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind

 Helping students to understand their own learning is key in helping them develop skills to be life-long learners who will be able to meet the demands and challenges in a world that continues to rapidly change. No one is really sure what will happen in the next 10 years but it will probably be very different than it is today while remaining very similar in many ways. 
Assessment For Learning
Assessment For Learning takes place throughout the learning process from the beginning of the school year until it ends. With the use of different digital platforms, this process can continue throughout the entire time a student is in school, with learning events and reflections occurring in a variety of ways all the while parts of these events being digitally captured to allow teachers, students, and parents to see the growth over time and identify areas that might need further development. 
Assessment for learning occurs throughout the learning process. It is designed to make each student’s understanding visible, so that teachers can decide what they can do to help students progress. Students learn in individual and idiosyncratic ways, yet, at the same time, there are predictable patterns of connections and preconceptions that some students may experience as they move along the continuum from emergent to proficient. In assessment for learning, teachers use assessment as an investigative tool to find out as much as they can about what their students know and can do, and what confusions, preconceptions, or gaps they might have.
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind
Organization such as Canadian Assessment for Learning Network support teachers, schools and parents with Assessment For Learning and work to provide great understanding about the role of Assessment For Learning and it's use within the learning process. 
Assessment Of Learning
Assessment of Learning can be described as a snapshot of a person's learning at a particular point in time. This has traditionally been what was reported on a traditional report card with a grade. 
Assessment of learning refers to strategies designed to confirm what students know, demonstrate whether or not they have met curriculum outcomes or the goals of their individualized programs, or to certify proficiency and make decisions about students’ future programs or placements. It is designed to provide evidence of achievement to parents, other educators, the students themselves, and sometimes to outside groups (e.g., employers, other educational institutions).
Assessment of learning is the assessment that becomes public and results in statements or symbols about how well students are learning.
Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind
Various school divisions in Saskatchewan, in Canada, and around the globe have begun to adopt a report card that focuses on feedback and growth as opposed to grades. As with all change, there is resistance of this form of reporting and, in some cases, a call to return to traditional grades. 
What do you think?
This is just a very general overview of Assessment As, For, and Of Learning. There are many more nuances to assessment that often are not discussed. I would highly recommend you check out these resources for a much greater discussion of assessment:
Softening the Edges - by Katie White - an great book about many of the parts of assessment that don't often get discussed. I highly recommend this book as it will challenge you to think of assessment in new ways. 
Checking for Understanding - by Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey - A great book that highlights the use of Formative Assessment at all grade levels. 
Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design - by Carol Ann Tomlinson and Jay McTighe - this has been my go to book for addressing the whole assessment piece - planning like an assessor not like an activity planner. 
What do you think? What are your thought about assessment? How would you like to see things change? 
Join #saskedchat Thursday night at 8pm CST as we explore this topic.

Formative Assessment – #saskedchat May 4th, 2017

Formative Assessment - Key to Learning


This week, #saskedchat will explore Formative Assessment - Key to Learning a topic suggested by Dawn Bick an elementary science teacher from Fishers, IN.

Formative Assessment


Formative Assessment has become an important part of classroom assessment, providing teachers with a variety of information to support student learning. One of the most important aspects of FA is that it needs to inform upcoming lessons and be used by the teacher to make adjustments to meet the needs of the students. Using FA without using the information it provides is akin to checking a weather app but wearing shorts no matter the forecast.

There are a variety of different FA instructional strategies that teachers can use at all stages of a lesson - Before, During, or After learning.

Susan M. Brookhart's Formative Assessment Strategies for Every Classroom: An ASCD Action Tool, 2nd Edition is a good resource for all teachers. It not only describes FA but provides a variety of strategies for developing FA, strategies for developing FA, and describes how to use FA in the classroom.

The article 5 Fantastic, Fast, Formative Assessment Tools by Vicki Davis (@coolcatteacher) describes Formative Assessment tools that teacher can use with technology including Kahoot, Socrative, and such tools as Plickers and QuickKey.

Natalie Regier, M. Ed. provides 60 Assessment Strategies that teachers can use -
This is a good resource for all teachers as it provides strategies that can be used at different age/grade levels.


What is Formative Assessment?

FA is the use of different assessment strategies to gather data about student learning to determine what students know and what they need to learn to meet a goal or outcome, using that information to plan and make adjustments to meet the learning needs of students.

According to Susan M. Brookhart (2010) -

The best formative assessment involves both students and teachers in a recursive process. It starts with the teacher, who models the process for . the students. At first, the concept of what good work "looks like" belongs to the teacher. The teacher describes, explains, or demonstrates the concepts or skills to be taught, or assigns student investigations—reading assigned material, locating and reading materials to answer a question, doing activities or experiments—to put content into students' hands.

Formative Assessment helps students to develop meta-cognitive skills - learning how to learn - which are important as the student becomes an independent learner. "Learning how to learn—that is, learning the metacognitive skills that will ultimately contribute to lifelong learning—begins with specific acts of self-assessment" (Brookhart, 2010). Helping students to develop skills as independent learners is important in a world that is undergoing intensive changes and requires people to be 'always learning' in order to be active and informed citizens in a connected global society.

Formative Assessment is not graded. It's used to inform instruction, provide feedback about what student's know and where learning gaps exist, and help students improve and grow. This reduces 'grading anxiety' that many students have as they focus on the grade they received and not on the feedback or how they can improve. FA helps to reduce anxiety about a 'grade' and provides students the opportunity to improve their work through an iterative process of feedback and self-assessment.

Formative and Summative Assessment


"Formative and summative assessment should both serve the same learning goals. This is how they are connected. The assessments students use as they develop, practice, and learn should be based on the same knowledge and skills they will ultimately demonstrate for a grade" (Brookhart, 2010). Formative Assessment provides students the opportunity to practice and improve without the pressure of attaching a grade to the work and prepares them for summative assessment.

Formative Assessment is part of the planning process and needs to be developed during the process of planning. By planning for FA, teachers shift their focus from planning activities for students to planning growth and feedback loops for students. The activity, whatever it might be, is part of the learning process which includes opportunities for students to demonstrate learning in a variety of ways and receive feedback for improvement before any form of summative assessment takes place.

Formative Assessment – #saskedchat May 4th, 2017

Formative Assessment - Key to Learning


This week, #saskedchat will explore Formative Assessment - Key to Learning a topic suggested by Dawn Bick an elementary science teacher from Fishers, IN.

Formative Assessment


Formative Assessment has become an important part of classroom assessment, providing teachers with a variety of information to support student learning. One of the most important aspects of FA is that it needs to inform upcoming lessons and be used by the teacher to make adjustments to meet the needs of the students. Using FA without using the information it provides is akin to checking a weather app but wearing shorts no matter the forecast.

There are a variety of different FA instructional strategies that teachers can use at all stages of a lesson - Before, During, or After learning.

Susan M. Brookhart's Formative Assessment Strategies for Every Classroom: An ASCD Action Tool, 2nd Edition is a good resource for all teachers. It not only describes FA but provides a variety of strategies for developing FA, strategies for developing FA, and describes how to use FA in the classroom.

The article 5 Fantastic, Fast, Formative Assessment Tools by Vicki Davis (@coolcatteacher) describes Formative Assessment tools that teacher can use with technology including Kahoot, Socrative, and such tools as Plickers and QuickKey.

Natalie Regier, M. Ed. provides 60 Assessment Strategies that teachers can use -
This is a good resource for all teachers as it provides strategies that can be used at different age/grade levels.


What is Formative Assessment?

FA is the use of different assessment strategies to gather data about student learning to determine what students know and what they need to learn to meet a goal or outcome, using that information to plan and make adjustments to meet the learning needs of students.

According to Susan M. Brookhart (2010) -

The best formative assessment involves both students and teachers in a recursive process. It starts with the teacher, who models the process for . the students. At first, the concept of what good work "looks like" belongs to the teacher. The teacher describes, explains, or demonstrates the concepts or skills to be taught, or assigns student investigations—reading assigned material, locating and reading materials to answer a question, doing activities or experiments—to put content into students' hands.

Formative Assessment helps students to develop meta-cognitive skills - learning how to learn - which are important as the student becomes an independent learner. "Learning how to learn—that is, learning the metacognitive skills that will ultimately contribute to lifelong learning—begins with specific acts of self-assessment" (Brookhart, 2010). Helping students to develop skills as independent learners is important in a world that is undergoing intensive changes and requires people to be 'always learning' in order to be active and informed citizens in a connected global society.

Formative Assessment is not graded. It's used to inform instruction, provide feedback about what student's know and where learning gaps exist, and help students improve and grow. This reduces 'grading anxiety' that many students have as they focus on the grade they received and not on the feedback or how they can improve. FA helps to reduce anxiety about a 'grade' and provides students the opportunity to improve their work through an iterative process of feedback and self-assessment.

Formative and Summative Assessment


"Formative and summative assessment should both serve the same learning goals. This is how they are connected. The assessments students use as they develop, practice, and learn should be based on the same knowledge and skills they will ultimately demonstrate for a grade" (Brookhart, 2010). Formative Assessment provides students the opportunity to practice and improve without the pressure of attaching a grade to the work and prepares them for summative assessment.

Formative Assessment is part of the planning process and needs to be developed during the process of planning. By planning for FA, teachers shift their focus from planning activities for students to planning growth and feedback loops for students. The activity, whatever it might be, is part of the learning process which includes opportunities for students to demonstrate learning in a variety of ways and receive feedback for improvement before any form of summative assessment takes place.

The Cost of Learning

https://www.flickr.com/photos/zoonabar/6982306666/sizes/l


Learning is what I do, we do, each & every day of our lives. It is how we grow, connect, and interact with the world around us. But what happens when we stop learning for the sake of learning and focus solely on measuring what we can do and how we do it? 

Or worse yet, we take away the very heart of what it means to learn as we stiffle the communities that are meant to nurture and inspire learning?

When I was growing up, the focus was on rote skills and information. The more I knew the better the learner I was and would become. Test taking was the gauge for intelligence and abiltity. It became the focus of education, no matter what age, grade, or level you were. Academics were the only standard upon which our society seemed to measure success.

The interesting fact of the matter is that, in this day and age, information is aplenty globally, via the world wide web. It can be accessed at our fingertips 24/7

Over time, how we learn has changed as well as what it means to find success. We honour multiples styles, intelligences, gifts, and strengths. We seek to understand the why and how, rather than the what from our learners. We have begin to see the importance in cultivating a true understanding of critical thinking and creative problem solving. We celebrate unique skillsets, we advocate to cultivate and grow mindsets that stretch and shape daily.  We honour opportunities to learn as essential steps taken on the journey to learn. 

Sadly? We seem to have come full circle. 

As an educator I find myself, in the here and now, watching as we lose sight of where have come from at great sacrifice. Focusing on grades without thinking about the whole child is to the detriment of all. It is ultimately the learner will make their way in this world, adventuring for a lifetime. They need a wide variety of talents, skills, and strengths in order to find success.

Is this the cost of learning we are willing to sacrifice?

It is my vision that we will listen to our collective voice as educators, decades of research, experience, and expertise that know & value the importance of showcasing the uniqueness of each individual. There is no greater value than investing in those that matter most.

Parenting: Introduction

I am currently reading Paul David Tripp’s book called Parenting: 14 Gospel Principles that Can Radically Change Your Family.  We were given this gift when our daughter was

Photo 2017-01-15, 10 27 44 AM

Adelyn was dedicated Jan. 15, 2017

dedicated at our church. Now that I’m finished my masters, I actually feel like I have time to read it!  I will start reading some other novels as well, but I figured why not start with a parenting book while she’s young! Not everyone will agree or believe everything this book says, but I thought it would be good for me to blog my way through it and share what I am learning as I go. (Also a great place to post some of the pictures I have of Adelyn just sitting on my phone!)

Currently our daughter is just about 7 months old.  I started reading the book tonight, and though the chapter was already talking about behaviour, sibling fights, sports teams and academics etc. (which don’t apply to our current situation quite yet), I figured there’s no better time to learn about parenting then now. And sure enough! I was already convicted of some things in my heart that I feel I need to work on.

Chapter summary

The Introduction’s main point was that parents can either be ambassadors or owners. Tripp explains this as your worldview about your children; do you believe they are yours to own or is your job to ‘steward’ them as gifts from God?

“Ownership parenting is motivated and shaped by what parents want for their children and from their children. It is driven by a vision of what we want our children to be and what we want our children to give us in return” (Tripp, 2016, p. 14).

This is very similar to the marriage advice he gives in his book, What Did You Expect?
He said that we often use our spouse as vehicles or obstacles to get what we want. It can be the same with our children. It becomes a user/consumer mentality.

His alternative is ambassador parenting.  This is the view that our children are gifts from God and we don’t own them, but we steward them to the best of our ability.

“The only thing an ambassador does, if he’s interested in keeping his job, is to faithfully represent the message, methods, and character of the leader who has sent him” (Tripp, 2016, p. 14).

An ambassador parent’s job would be to try their best to reflect godly principles and messages to their children.

My take-aways

1) My identity does not come from Adelyn. Period.  “Owner parents tend to look to get

IMG_2295

‘Auntie’ Ashley having fun with some Snapchat filters!

their identity, meaning, purpose, and inner sense of well-being from their children” (p. 17). Funny how I used to find myself struggling with getting my identity from my job!  Have a kid, and sure enough… that can be easily replaced by a little one.  Now, I know I can take great JOY in my daughter.  I can love how cute she is, how good she sleeps, how well “behaved” she is when she is tired etc. but this does not, and should not reflect my true worth. The point is, that if my worth comes from her appearance and behaviours, then I will be the most proud parent one minute, and the most discouraged, disappointed parent the next.  It’s the “Saviour” complex.  Looking to Adelyn to have her make or break my day is not a role she was made for.  Ambassador parents are “freed from asking family life to give them life because they have found life and their hearts are at rest” (p. 18).

2) I don’t have to dread Adelyn’s awkward older years. I am a primary teacher for a reason. I love the cuteness of kids ages 3-7. I find them adorable, funny, clever, and their

7576744752_b8d3cc60f1_m

Photo credit: Laura Barberis via Flickr

imaginations are magical.  I’m not going to lie, I find 9-13 year olds kind of annoying. I do want to eventually teach that age group as I love that they are getting to be more independent and critical thinkers at that age.  (They also behave way better for their teachers than their parents)… but to be completely honest, I find them awkward and sometimes irritating.  My husband Jon and I have already joked about how those years with kids are going to be terrible.

This chapter totally convicted me of my selfish desire for my child to always be cute and funny for MY selfish wants. Owner parents “struggle with the crazy, zany phases that their children go through as they are growing up. They’re not so much concerned about what that craziness says about their children, but what it says about them” (p. 20). On the other hand, ambassador parents “have come to understand that parenting will expose them to public misunderstanding and embarrassment somehow, someway. They have come to accept the humbling messiness of the job God has called them to do” (p. 20).

IMG_2294

Speaking of messiness…

If I am to honour Adelyn in every way that I can as her parent, I need to allow her to grow into the little human God has called her to be.  I can release her from living up to my expectations, and I can try my best to impart knowledge, grace, and love to her. She is already an awesome baby DESPITE me, not BECAUSE of me. I’m doing my best, but have already had so many parenting fails! I need to remember the truth and strive to be an ambassador parent.

Just for fun share time. I keep track of many of my parenting fails in a note in my phone. It keeps me humble 🙂

Parenting fail #1

IMG_2355

First week of parenting: I thought breastfeeding was going great! I figured she was perfectly latched and that the milk was going, I don’t know, into her mouth?

Parenting fail #2- I spelled her name wrong on the invitation to her church baby shower. Oops!

Many more fails to come! Anything connect or resonate with you? Do you struggle with ownership parenting? Comment below and share your experience!


Summary of Learning, Part 2

Our last day of class, we gathered together with ECMP355 class and shared our learning journeys. We did not have enough time to watch all of our summary of learning, but there were some new programs that I wanted to try in my future classrooms.

Carmelle had shared her Summary of Learning! created using StoryJumper: a digital storybook creator. I have used Storybird, another digital storybook creator, with my Gr. 5 ELA during my internship. My students were very excited about publishing their stories online at first, but soon they expressed their frustrations with this program. Although the artworks on Storybird are beautiful and inspiring, you can only choose one set of artworks. You cannot switch the set of artworks, and you face the limited selections, which I did not know about. Some students wanted to add their own drawings but they couldn’t because I did not know how to become the contributor. However, StoryJumper allows users to add their own photos, graphics, and artworks; moreover, voice recording!! This program looked much more exciting and appropriate for elementary schools for sure!

Although I have been enthusiastic about #Edtech and new online learning tools and opportunities to try out in classrooms, I often thought about the digital divide that persists in my own community in one corner of my head. I started to realize that it is not about the availability of devices among families anymore, but rather it is the lack of digital literacy for school purpose (and confidence) among teachers. The devices and programs available are not being utilized to full potential.

At the end of our class, Alec and Katia shared three videos of the summary of learning from ECI834. These three videos blew my mind and I just cannot stop thinking about ‘blended learning/classroom model.’ In schools, desktop computers have been replaced with laptops or iPads (mobile carts); thus, it enables us to foster this model. We should be incorporating available technologies and devices to differentiate students’ learnings and assessments.

To end this post, I just wanted to share the videos from ECI834 class.

First, from Andres

Then, from Graham

Finally, from Logan

Khan Academy is awesome. I found resources for blended learning

https://www.khanacademy.org/resources/using-technology-in-the-classroom/four-different-blended-learning-models/v/sscc-blended-station


Yousician guitar lesson progress

I have talked about some positives of using Yousician in the past, and I want to add a couple more things I learned about this app.

  1. E-mail progress report: it will provide you a snapshot of your progress. As you can see, I have been working on my fretting positions.
    Screenshots of Yousician email report, edited using Paint

    2. Weekly Challenge: it was 2 songs practicing 2 ways: frets and chords. I did try fret exercises, but I found that the beat for ‘Funk’ was not in my body. I just couldn’t get it. I need to get used to the Funky beats.

    Weekly Challenge Email

    3. Certificate: PDF downloadable certificate was sent to my mailbox. I am not going to print it out, but it did give me a little bit of tickle in my heart.

    Screenshot – certificate of completion

    I am not sure if these features would motivate you, but it did for me a little bit. The weekly report reminded me when I did not practice much in a week and I did try practice more in following week.